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CC Alumnus turned Peace Corps Volunteer Paints His Service

St. Louis Post Dispatch, Feb. 28

http://interact.stltoday.com/pr/arts-entertainment/PR022815074620538

 

Cougar women’s basketball coach talks living and coaching in Columbia

Posted by on Sep 22, 2017 in Faculty/Staff | 0 comments

Cougar women’s basketball coach talks living and coaching in Columbia

September 18, 2017 – via Inside Columbia Magazine

 “It is not very often a college coach — or any coach for that matter — is asked to write something on their own. We see many articles in the daily sports section about coaches and their athletic programs. They always come from the minds and talents of the individual writer. When asked to take this opportunity to write something about coaching, I couldn’t pass it up. As the new head coach at Columbia College for the women’s basketball program, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for letting me entertain you with my thoughts for the next couple of minutes.”

READ MORE:  “Net Gains” – Inside Columbia Magazine

Columbia College partners with Missouri Sheriffs’ Association

Posted by on Sep 20, 2017 in Students | 0 comments

Columbia College partners with Missouri Sheriffs’ Association

Continuing its commitment to assisting law enforcement officers reach their goals, Columbia College has teamed up with the Missouri Sheriffs’ Association (MSA) as a preferred education partner for candidates advancing through police academy with the MSA.

“Columbia College offers students in law enforcement many avenues to pursue an education, and we’re proud to partner with the MSA,” said Patty Anderson, associate director of business development in the Columbia College Marketing office.

In order to become a police officer after graduating from the MSA academy, many law enforcement agencies require applicants to have completed at least 60 credit hours from an accredited college, or 30 or more credit hours along with two years of service as a federal active duty military member or as a full-time certified peace officer. As part of this new partnership, the MSA recommends its cadets attend Columbia College during their time in the academy, while the college offers a quality education at an affordable price, along with perks such as the Partners in Law Enforcement (PILE) program.

“Well-trained and educated individuals tend to be better law enforcement officers,” said Kevin Merritt, training director with the MSA. “We are excited about our partnership and the ability to offer our academy graduates a true career path to success.”

The PILE program awards up to 24 hours of academic credit for students who have completed a qualifying police academy such as the MSA’s, which provides for a quicker path to a degree and could help save thousands of dollars in tuition. Columbia College’s Criminal Justice Administration and Human Services Department allows students to pursue an education in criminal justice administration, forensic science and human services, offering such concentrations as corrections, counseling, law enforcement and more.

Safety first for Columbia College students

Posted by on Sep 14, 2017 in Day Campus, Featured Story | 0 comments

Safety first for Columbia College students

Director of Campus Safety Bob Klausmeyer stood at the front of Dorsey Gym, preparing to educate a group of about 30 Columbia College students on the importance of ensuring their personal safety.

The Hulett Family Campus Safety Office sits in the heart of campus on the Quad.
(Photo by Kaci Smart)

He stopped short of being their sensei.

“I’m not here to teach you karate or anything like that,” Klausmeyer said. “That’s not my forte.”

Klausmeyer was there to provide safety tips to students as part of Safety Night with Student Government Association on September 5. He introduced himself and the rest of the Campus Safety officers who patrol the main campus in Columbia, Missouri, and help keep its students, faculty and staff safe and comfortable with their surroundings.

SGA President Daymond Dollens said the event, part of Columbia College’s programming for National Campus Safety Awareness Month in September, was meant to inform attendees of all the resources available to them on campus.

“For a lot of students, this is kind of a new area,” said Dollens, a junior. “We want to make sure they know who the Campus Safety officers are, what Campus Safety can do, all the different safety precautions they can take on campus. We have a longstanding record of being a safe campus, and we want to continue that. Part of that is making sure our students are aware of the different safety precautions they can take.”

The most anticipated part of the evening, of course, was the self-defense training.

The students arranged themselves in a circle as Klausmeyer demonstrated ways to knee or jab a would-be attacker to create a momentary distraction and window for escape. He had fellow Campus Safety officer Will Nichols put him in chokeholds and wrist holds, then showed the students ways to break out of them.

After the students practiced on each other, Klausmeyer and Nichols picked up pads and allowed the students to rain knees and punches down on them.

“Do it at about 20 percent. Don’t go the full 100 percent on anybody,” Klausmeyer said. “And don’t choke out your roommate. I don’t want to get any reports about that.”

Aside from the physical activity, Klausmeyer also educated attendees on the basics of keeping themselves safe as they’re out and about. He went through three levels of preparedness — “Personal Awareness and Preparation;” “Situational Awareness and Preparation” and “Fight and Escape” — and went over the essentials of each step.

The goal is to recognize the signs of a potentially dangerous situation and steer clear of it. If that’s impossible, the goal is to figure out a way to extricate yourself from the situation as soon and as safely as possible.

“The idea is not to fight,” Klausmeyer said. “The idea is to get away.”

And, if you should find yourself in trouble on campus, a Campus Safety officer is only a phone call away at (573) 875-7315. Klausmeyer and his staff have made efforts to be a more visible presence for Columbia College students in tandem with the new Hulett Family Campus Safety Office going up on the Quad before last school year.

Lauren Lagemann, a junior and the SGA vice president of administration, said she and some friends were running through Alumni Fountain shortly after the start of school last year when an officer approached them.

She thought they were in trouble. Instead, the officer offered to take a picture for them.

“They’re there to help you, even if you just want to talk to them,” Lagemann said. “They’re really there to make sure your college experience is more enjoyable and safe.”

Throughout the month of September, the Campus Safety staff has been offering safety tips to the campus community through methods such as social media, printed materials and announcements on campus television screens.

“When students can feel safe on campus, then they can be successful in the other aspects,” Dollens said. “We have a great record of that. We’ve been named the safest campus in Missouri, and that’s a good thing to carry, that reputation.”

Dr. Piyusha Singh named Columbia College Chief of Staff

Posted by on Sep 12, 2017 in Academics, Faculty/Staff, Instagram, Online Education | 1 comment

Dr. Piyusha Singh named Columbia College Chief of Staff

Dr. Piyusha Singh

Columbia College President Scott Dalrymple announced today that Dr. Piyusha Singh will serve as the college’s first chief of staff. In her new role, Singh will assist in examining and responding to important issues that span across the college while also continuing to serve as the vice president of Online Education. Her new title will be vice president and chief of staff.

“The addition of a chief of staff allows me to better leverage time and resources while increasing efficiency and effectiveness,” said Dalrymple. “Dr. Singh has my complete confidence, and I look forward to working with her as she defines an important new role for the college.”

Since joining the college in June 2015, Singh has worked tirelessly to enhance the online program for students and instructors alike. She and her team have worked with faculty to update more than 200 online classes with the goal of creating an even better student experience in all courses and degree paths.

Singh has also played a key role in ensuring curricula throughout the college’s Day, Evening, Adult Higher Education and Online Education offerings are in lockstep across all programs. During the Fall 2016 Semester, 73 percent of all Columbia College students took at least one course online, with the majority combining their online education with in-seat offerings.

Singh holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and geography from Mount Holyoke College and a Ph.D. in public policy and management from Carnegie Mellon University. She has taught courses in informatics and criminal justice at both the University of Albany and Excelsior College. She also served as a program director for the master’s degree in criminal justice at Excelsior College.

CC Employee Transitions – August 2017

Posted by on Sep 12, 2017 in Faculty/Staff | 0 comments

CC Employee Transitions – August 2017

college colors day group photoOutside of our students and alumni, our employees are some of Columbia College’s biggest and best assets. Welcome to these employees who joined the college or changed positions in August.

New Associates

  • Arthur Betts, Campus Safety Officer – Campus Safety, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/9/17
  • James Orr, Computer Support Technician, Marysville, Washington – began 8/9/17
  • Joseph Simpson, Tutoring Coordinator and Writing Specialist – Writing Center, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/14/17
  • Catherine Heckmaster, Systems Analyst – Technology Services, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Kristopher Poore, Admissions Process Coordinator – Admissions, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Dusti Mitchell, Compliance Specialist – Institutional Compliance, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Carol Reed-Black, Student Support Assistant, Lake Ozark, Missouri – began 8/28/17
  • Erica VanSteenhuyse, Online Test Proctor, Denver, Colorado – began 8/28/17
  • James Tolson, Building Monitor, Orlando, Florida – began 8/28/17
  • Matthew Glindemann, Math Tutor – Math Center, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/28/17
  • Lisa Rogers-McAbee, Online Test Proctor, Mesquite, Texas – began 8/28/17
  • Sarah Wright, Clinical Instructor – Nursing, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/28/17
  • Layton Light, Custodian – Custodial Services, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/28/17
  • Jennifer Morris, Assistant Director, Campus Support – Adult Higher Education, Columbia, Missouri – began 9/5/17
  • Marsha Thompson, Veteran Outreach Manager – Veterans Services Center, Columbia, Missouri – began 9/5/17
  • Heather Sanders, Test Proctor, Fort Worth, Texas – began 9/5/17
  • Brooke Githegi, Academic Advisor I, Honolulu, Hawaii – began 9/5/17
  • Molly Taylor, Administrative Assistant, Education – School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Columbia, Missouri – began 9/6/17
  • Jason Reimund, English Tutor, Jefferson City, Missouri – began 9/6/17

 Transfers & New Positions:

  • James Ash from Admissions Process Coordinator – Admissions to Systems Operations Associate – Office of the Registrar, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Kaci Naros from Process Coordinator to Academic Advisor I, Jefferson City, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Mark Bowles from Assistant Director Graduate and Adult Admissions – Admissions to Student Support Services Director – Student Support Services, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Erin Mazzola from Student Conduct Officer – Student Affairs to Assistant Dean for Student Affairs – Student Affairs, Columbia, Missouri – began 8/21/17
  • Angie Malone from Systems Operations Associate – Office of the Registrar to Systems Analyst – Technology Services, Columbia, Missouri – began 9/4/17
  • Kate Sanchez from Records Coordinator to Systems Operations Associate – Office of the Registrar, Columbia, Missouri – began 9/4/17
  • Alisa Massie from Process Coordinator to Admissions Process Coordinator, Kansas City, Missouri – begins 10/2/17

Join the many employees who support our college by making a payroll pledge online or one-time donation, online or by mail. Visit www.ccis.edu/wearecc to get started today.

Columbia College welcomes new students with ‘Explorientation’

Posted by on Sep 8, 2017 in Featured Story, Students | 0 comments

Columbia College welcomes new students with ‘Explorientation’

New Columbia College students lined up, one by one, in Southwell Complex to shake the hand of Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs David Starrett and receive the pin that would serve as a tiny, metal microcosm for their higher education experience to come.

Scooter the Cougar leads new Columbia College students through Rogers Gate during the annual “Storm the Gate” event August 27.
(Photos by Kaci Smart)

The pin features Rogers Gate, the large stone archway leading onto Bass Commons, through which the students run the day before classes start in their first fall semester during the “Storm the Gate” event. Ivy is another prominent feature on the pin, the vines that Columbia College students drape themselves in on the morning of graduation day for the Ivy Chain ceremony, which has been a tradition at the college since 1900.

“This pin is to remind you of the commitment you’ve made to yourself, your classmates, the institution and the community,” Starrett told the 223 new students who took part in the Columbia College Traditional Pinning Ceremony on August 24. “It will be a memento for you to remember this first day, this new beginning, when you stood with your classmates, embarking on your journey full of enthusiasm or excitement over the unknown.”

The new student pinning ceremony kicked off this year’s Explorientation festivities at Columbia College, a series of more than 30 events beginning the week before the start of the fall semester (August 28) and ending with homecoming weekend (October 7).

At the pinning ceremony, after receiving their pins from Starrett, new students advanced to a line of the 10 department chairs, where the faculty affixed the pins to their shirts and the students started putting faces to the names of their instructors.

Student Government Association President Daymond Dollens, a junior, told the crowd that he likened a student’s path through school to riding a bicycle.

“Today is the day the training wheels come off,” Dollens said. “Free to ride without the assistance of your parents, they still remind you to wear your helmet, watch for traffic and give lots of other pieces of advice, but you’re riding on your own. All the efforts by your parents and teachers helped you build a strong reputation and a solid foundation. The way you ride that bike, who you ride it with and the decisions you make along the way will determine how safe you are and how far you will ride.”

Family and friends got the chance to take pictures with their new college pupils and wish them a fond farewell as they embarked on a new journey at Columbia College.

Check out the photo gallery below for images from move-in day at the dorms, the pinning ceremony, the “Let’s Get It Started” fun and games and Storm the Gate.

CC Focus: Dean for Student Affairs Dave Roberts

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017 in Faculty/Staff, Featured Story | 1 comment

CC Focus: Dean for Student Affairs Dave Roberts

Over the past six years, Dave Roberts has watched the momentum build on Columbia College’s main campus.

Columbia College Dean for Student Affairs Dave Roberts
(Photo by Kaci Smart)

He worked as assistant, then associate dean for Student Affairs as the R. Marvin Owens Field renovations and Brouder Science Center construction took place, enhancing student life on campus. Then came President Scott Dalrymple’s push for the Quad and other student-friendly improvements such as hammocks, a fire pit and a sand volleyball court. The Day Campus in Columbia has seen solid growth over the past two years, and the college announced plans for a new Academic and Residence Hall that is scheduled to be completed in 2019.

Roberts took over for longtime Dean for Student Affairs Faye Burchard upon her retirement in January and his interim tag was removed in May after a national search. His first full semester as dean started Monday, August 28.

“It’s exciting and terrifying all at the same time,” Roberts said, with a laugh. “We’re at a really exciting time at Columbia College.”

Roberts worked with students at the University of South Florida, Southern Methodist University and the University of Missouri before coming to Columbia College in 2011. As he navigates his first months heading the college’s Student Affairs division, Roberts is keying in on the staff combinations and program offerings that will keep his team performing at a high level.

As always, the students come first.

“When you’re sitting here for six years, you see things. You read the tea leaves,” Roberts said. “I’ve been watching, waiting and had these ideas, and now I have the ability to make these happen and use these as strategic directions for the division.”

Learn more about Roberts and his vision for Student Affairs in the latest CC Focus!

CCC: How has your role changed from associate dean for Student Affairs to dean?

DR: Some of the bigger changes for me are being the face of Student Affairs, in a new way. Before, I was the person running around dealing with crises behind the scenes. I see being out there as a really important part of my role: how I represent our division to the campus, how I represent what we do to support students to the students, and then how we engage in the community. I want Columbia, MO, to know why it’s so meaningful to the community to have a college like ours.

CCC: Why did you decide to come to Columbia College?

DR: I was looking for an opportunity to do something new in student affairs. I had my master’s in student affairs — and I’m right now pursuing my doctorate in higher education leadership — so, for me, this was a great leadership role. However, getting here, I really fell in love with this place. My day isn’t confined to one topic or one job. I get to do a lot of things and work with a lot of people. I get to know people across campus and across the country at our Nationwide locations. I like that piece of it. The role at first was what drew me in, but then the intricacies of who we are as an institution.

CCC: How do you see yourself shaping the division?

DR: Leadership education is something that really rings home to me in my background. Part of the new senior coordinator’s job within leadership development is to create online webinars and videos for us to provide not only to day students, but to nationwide and online students. In conjunction with Career Services, we’re hearing from employers that the stuff that matters the most is the soft skills they bring to the job. So some of those soft skills in terms of leadership, communication and strategic planning is something we’re really trying to emphasize. I’d also like us to have a greater commitment to social justice issues, and being able to provide support for marginalized students on our campus, whether that’s students of color, LGBTQIA students or other groups. My hope is that, over time, we create a resource office on campus for students that can help be the voice of those students. I’d also like to see us grow our connections to Career Services. I think they bring a lot of value in terms of information that can be shared, not only with students but also with faculty members on what trends are coming in careers.

CCC: How big of an impact will the new Academic and Residence Hall make on campus life?

DR: It’s going to be huge! We have great residence hall facilities, we have a great facilities staff that keeps up with them, but they’re older residence halls. I think it helps breathe new life into the campus, when you have a nice, new building and students get really excited about a new place to live. The location is ideal, and there’s a great community building space in the hall and also a great connection to the business school. I’ve already had sophomores emailing me, asking me to put them on the list to live there on the top floor, so they can overlook the soccer field. The students have been very excited about it. I’m really trying to be intentional about giving them the opportunity to have some input on the hall as it relates to the style of furnishings and design elements.

CCC: How is your staff coming together?

DR: I’m really excited and proud of our staff, both professional and student staff. We have a great team, they do a ton to support students. They’re some of the hardest-working people on campus. The students’ success is our success. Our staff does that as good, if not better, than any other Student Affairs divisions out there.

Online Education CC 360 Fall Edition

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017 in Online Education | 0 comments

Online Education CC 360 Fall Edition

It’s all about “The Dash”

By Jerry Patton, director, AHE Student Academic Support & Online Student Services

main campus fall photoIf you have not read the poem “The Dash” by Linda Ellis, do yourself a favor and take the time from your day to Google it — you may find it to be quite motivational. It is a quick read, and the message is simple.

We are born, and eventually we die. When we die, someone we love marks those dates on our gravestone and separates them with a dash. The dates themselves are significantly less important than the dash between them, as it is the dash that represents not when we lived but, rather, how we lived. The poem begs the question, “What will you do with your dash?”

You might be wondering what this has to do with your education, right? Your education is a gift you give to yourself and others, as it prepares you to use your dash to make a positive impact on the world. Among many other outcomes, your education may help you to move into a management position where you have a positive impact, increase your credibility and power to persuade or serve as an inspiration to others who have not yet made the commitment to complete their degrees. Whatever the impact of your education, it is and always will be an important part of your dash.

Whether you are just starting your education with the Columbia College Online Education program, are somewhere in the middle or nearing the end of your degree, remember that with education comes opportunity. Stay focused, complete your degree, maximize the opportunities that come your way and use your education to create opportunities that otherwise may not have been possible. Ensure that your dash makes a difference!

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You are not alone

By Kim Major, senior academic advisor for Ready.Aim.Hire.

adult student learnersYou are not alone. That statement is as true for an adult student as it was for Fox Mulder in the TV show The X-Files.

Deciding to begin higher education as an adult or return to it after being away for a long period of time is a courageous choice! It’s not going to be as scary as you might think. Here is proof that you are not alone. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) projected a 13-percent increase in enrollment of nontraditional (adult) students between 2011 and 2021.

So if you are an adult who chooses to pursue higher education, how will you choose your first course? What do you need to know about studying? Where can you find help if you struggle?

Here are some tips for returning and new adult students that might help you along the way:

  • Meet with your advisor. She or he works for you! Think about your favorite subjects in high school or courses you had success with in college, if this is not your first time in college. Your academic advisor will then help you select your first class.
  • Begin with an introductory course, even if you’ve attended college before. Try a beginning course in your major, such as BIOL 108, CJAD 101, HUMS 105, MGMT 150, PSYC 101 or SOCI 111, OR take something in an area that interests you, such as HIST 121 or ARTS 105, OR even take a course to help you refresh or learn new skills, such as INCC 123 or ENGL 107.
  • Before you go to your first night of class or log into an online class, read the course syllabus. Hopefully, you’ve already looked at it, but take time to read it again. Flip through your textbook. Better yet, read the first chapter. You do have your textbook, don’t you?
  • Get to know fellow students and create a support network. Exchange contact information. Support from family and friends is one of the most important success factors for adult learners.
  • Use your resources, including our online Tutoring Services and electronic library. You can find the current Tutoring Services schedule here, and some Nationwide locations offer face-to-face math and English tutoring free of charge. The library has course guides for a ton of subjects, from art and biology to psychology and religious studies as well as many other areas tied to specific Columbia College courses.
  • Talk to your instructor, especially if you feel unsure or are struggling.
  • Consult the list of strategies for success, specifically for nontraditional adult learners. At Columbia College, the Writing Center and Tutoring Services webpages have links to study strategies and skills, including time management, note-taking styles, test-taking tips and other helpful topics.

Once you get through that first course, you will be able to build on your experience and become increasingly successful. You are ready to begin!

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We want to hear from you!

By Columbia College Public Relations

survey graphicThe CC 360 Nationwide digital newsletters are an informative way to keep our community up to date on all the happenings around Columbia College, and we want your help making them the best they can be!

We want to hear from you. We want to give you a chance to tell us which features you use the most when we send out our newsletters at the beginning of each semester, what sort of content you like to see, and what types of things you would like to see more of in future editions of the newsletter.

Simply click on this link and take our anonymous, nine-question survey about the CC 360 digital newsletters to make your voice heard. Your feedback is appreciated!

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Financial aid for nontraditional students

By Department of Student Success and Money Stacks

money stacks, financial awarenessCollege holds a different, unique set of challenges for adult learners, nontraditional students who are either picking up their college education again or entering an institution for the first time since high school.

The challenges start before enrolling in classes, continue during a college career that includes juggling family and professional responsibilities with schooling and extend long after a degree is earned, with financial-aid debt.

Yes, most students — traditional and nontraditional alike — incur debt. But nontraditional students have a special set of circumstances to consider when deciding whether to take on this debt, as well as how much they can take on.

A U.S. News & World Report article from January 2017 highlighted three potential financial aid traps for nontraditional students to avoid:

  • Not completing a degree: A 2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York study concluded that students who don’t complete their degrees are significantly more likely to default on their loans than ones who do. This leaves borrowers with no degree as well as financial liabilities. U.S. News & World Report urges nontraditional learners to find ways to navigate their courses without having to take out loans. Deliberate course planning will help to ensure academic success and may include limiting the number of courses taken to be able to pay out of pocket, utilizing tuition and student loan reimbursement programs through their employers and ensuring that opportunities to utilize Pell Grant funding are maximized. The Department of Student Success recommends working with advisors to ensure you are setting a good pace for yourself and, if you do end up needing to take time off school, to contact Student Success to talk about your options with loans to ensure you are able to successfully navigate the financial liability of loans.
  • Leaning on loans: If you’re going back to school to better your employment credentials in the hopes of earning more money in your career, consider the final balance. Will the potential increase in salary outweigh the loans you’ll eventually have to repay in order to earn your degree? The article points out that nontraditional students don’t qualify for many of the grant and scholarship programs that traditional students do, so they’re more likely to have to rely on federal and private loans. Student Success encourages students to look at an estimate of what their borrowing might end up at over their time in college to ensure that their return will be worth the investment (or loans). The good news is, at Columbia College, tuition for online undergraduate courses for 2017-18 is about half the cost of the national tuition and fees average for private nonprofit and for-profit institutions, based on a 30-credit-hour academic year.
  • Forgetting about the long term: A 22-year-old recent graduate has a 40-year career ahead of him or her before retirement age. That leaves plenty of time to pay off student debt. A 42-year-old recent graduate has to fit his or her financial obligations into a tighter window if he or she still wants to retire on time. U.S. News & World Report suggests budgeting a debt payment schedule based on your current income rather than any expected pay bump with a college degree. We hope that this encourages our students to look at paying off loans faster than required by the payment plan or borrow less. The more that they can do this, the faster they will get to a better financial place with their degree.

Even with financial aid considerations, going back to school is a decision that could pay off in the long run. According to 2015 U.S. Census data, the yearly median earnings for people 25 years and older were 21 percent higher with some college or an associate degree ($33,820) than with a high school diploma or equivalency ($28,043). The figure for bachelor’s degree holders ($50,595) was 80 percent higher than the high school earnings level, and the figure for graduate or professional degree holders ($66,857) was 138 percent higher. Education matters!

If you need any guidance utilizing the financial resources Columbia College has to offer or have questions about how to be a smart borrower, the Columbia College Department of Student Success and Money Stacks is here to help. You can contact the Department of Student Success and Money Stacks at (573) 875-7860 or studentsuccess@ccis.edu.

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What to consider when considering a career change

By Grossnickle Career Services Center

time for a change typewriter graphicLately, the staff at Columbia College’s Grossnickle Career Services Center has been getting variations on the same type of question quite frequently: “What should I know before making a career change?”

Deciding to leave your field for another can be a stressful process, definitely not one to be taken lightly. But, in the long run, it could also end up leading to a rewarding change of pace, either financially, emotionally or in other aspects of your life.

When considering whether to change careers, try to think about these things:

  • How do you feel at your current job? A February 2014 article from Fast Company magazine lists three telltale signs that it may be time to change careers. First, is your paycheck the only thing fueling your workday? Second, do you wake up every workday wishing you could be anywhere but where you are? Third, do you have bad performance reviews? If you’re getting no enjoyment out of your job, performing in a mediocre manner and only showing up every day to get paid, it may be time to move on.
  • Are you switching for the right reasons? So how can you tell whether you’ve hit a momentary rut at work or it’s time to plant roots somewhere else? An April 2013 article on KeppieCareers.com cautions against making rash decisions based on factors that may not even change with a career move. Evaluate why you’re unhappy with your job. Is it the work itself, or the office culture? If you’re frustrated with long hours or a lack of upward mobility, ask yourself if it’s worth starting at the bottom rung of the ladder somewhere else for the chance those aspects will be more favorable. If you’re feeling bored or unchallenged, think about how long it may be before you start feeling that way in a new career.
  • Is there anything you can do to improve your current situation? The answer to your work malaise may not be outside your workplace’s walls. It may lie within you. An April 2012 Forbes.com story on the biggest mistakes career changers make suggests that you start repairing relationships and building respect and skills at your current job before deciding whether to leave. If you do end up leaving, then you’re in a better position to succeed in your next career. If you stay, then you’ve taken steps to improve your workplace environment. Whatever you do, the article warns, make sure you put copious amounts of time and research into the decision. And if you do change careers, be sure to give yourself time to settle in before deciding you need to be on the move again!

If you’re in need of advice, you can also reach out to the Grossnickle Career Services Center at (573) 875-7425 or email careerservices@ccis.edu.

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Coast Guard Island CC 360 Fall Edition

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017 in Coast Guard Island | 0 comments

Coast Guard Island CC 360 Fall Edition

Congratulations, class of 2017!

By Dr. Darla Cuadra, director, Columbia College-Coast Guard Island

Graduation photo May 2017

The Columbia College-Coast Guard Island graduating class of 2017. (Photo by Ashley Wheeler)

In May, Columbia College-Coast Guard Island hosted its 39th annual commencement ceremony at Gresham Hall in Alameda, California. The class of 2017 was composed of 26 graduates, with 11 of them participating in the ceremony.

The ceremony was led by location director Dr. Darla Cuadra, with special guests Dr. Jeffrey Musgrove, vice president for Adult Higher Education from the main campus in Missouri, who conferred the degrees, and Ms. MarJean Knokey, director of Region IV and Columbia College-Whidbey Island. Also in attendance was Captain Jon P. Hickey, commanding officer of Base Alameda. His speech was inspiring and well received by the guests and graduates. Father Jayson Landeza, chaplain for the Oakland Police Department, provided the invocation and benediction. Mr. Brian Tremper, class of 1999, welcomed the graduates into the alumni association and led the alumni charge.

Two of the Coast Guard Island graduates also participated in the main campus commencement ceremony in April: Tenari Brown and Juan Ramirez, who was selected to represent AHE in the Ivy Chain ceremony.

The ceremony ended with a reception sponsored by the alumni association. We are extremely proud of our graduates and wish them all the best in their future endeavors!

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You are not alone

By Kim Major, senior academic advisor for Ready.Aim.Hire.

adult student learnersYou are not alone. That statement is as true for an adult student as it was for Fox Mulder in the TV show The X-Files.

Deciding to begin higher education as an adult or return to it after being away for a long period of time is a courageous choice! It’s not going to be as scary as you might think. Here is proof that you are not alone. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) projected a 13-percent increase in enrollment of nontraditional (adult) students between 2011 and 2021.

So if you are an adult who chooses to pursue higher education, how will you choose your first course? What do you need to know about studying? Where can you find help if you struggle?

Here are some tips for returning and new adult students that might help you along the way:

  • Meet with your advisor. She or he works for you! Think about your favorite subjects in high school or courses you had success with in college, if this is not your first time in college. Your academic advisor will then help you select your first class.
  • Begin with an introductory course, even if you’ve attended college before. Try a beginning course in your major, such as BIOL 108, CJAD 101, HUMS 105, MGMT 150, PSYC 101 or SOCI 111, OR take something in an area that interests you, such as HIST 121 or ARTS 105, OR even take a course to help you refresh or learn new skills, such as INCC 123 or ENGL 107.
  • Before you go to your first night of class or log into an online class, read the course syllabus. Hopefully, you’ve already looked at it, but take time to read it again. Flip through your textbook. Better yet, read the first chapter. You do have your textbook, don’t you?
  • Get to know fellow students and create a support network. Exchange contact information. Support from family and friends is one of the most important success factors for adult learners.
  • Use your resources, including our online Tutoring Services and electronic library. You can find the current Tutoring Services schedule here, and some Nationwide locations offer face-to-face math and English tutoring free of charge. The library has course guides for a ton of subjects, from art and biology to psychology and religious studies as well as many other areas tied to specific Columbia College courses.
  • Talk to your instructor, especially if you feel unsure or are struggling.
  • Consult the list of strategies for success, specifically for nontraditional adult learners. At Columbia College, the Writing Center and Tutoring Services webpages have links to study strategies and skills, including time management, note-taking styles, test-taking tips and other helpful topics.

Once you get through that first course, you will be able to build on your experience and become increasingly successful. You are ready to begin!

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We want to hear from you!

By Columbia College Public Relations

survey graphicThe CC 360 Nationwide digital newsletters are an informative way to keep our community up to date on all the happenings around Columbia College, and we want your help making them the best they can be!

We want to hear from you. We want to give you a chance to tell us which features you use the most when we send out our newsletters at the beginning of each semester, what sort of content you like to see, and what types of things you would like to see more of in future editions of the newsletter.

Simply click on this link and take our anonymous, nine-question survey about the CC 360 digital newsletters to make your voice heard. Your feedback is appreciated!

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Financial aid for nontraditional students

By Department of Student Success and Money Stacks

money stacks, financial awarenessCollege holds a different, unique set of challenges for adult learners, nontraditional students who are either picking up their college education again or entering an institution for the first time since high school.

The challenges start before enrolling in classes, continue during a college career that includes juggling family and professional responsibilities with schooling and extend long after a degree is earned, with financial-aid debt.

Yes, most students — traditional and nontraditional alike — incur debt. But nontraditional students have a special set of circumstances to consider when deciding whether to take on this debt, as well as how much they can take on.

A U.S. News & World Report article from January 2017 highlighted three potential financial aid traps for nontraditional students to avoid:

  • Not completing a degree: A 2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York study concluded that students who don’t complete their degrees are significantly more likely to default on their loans than ones who do. This leaves borrowers with no degree as well as financial liabilities. U.S. News & World Report urges nontraditional learners to find ways to navigate their courses without having to take out loans. Deliberate course planning will help to ensure academic success and may include limiting the number of courses taken to be able to pay out of pocket, utilizing tuition and student loan reimbursement programs through their employers and ensuring that opportunities to utilize Pell Grant funding are maximized. The Department of Student Success recommends working with advisors to ensure you are setting a good pace for yourself and, if you do end up needing to take time off school, to contact Student Success to talk about your options with loans to ensure you are able to successfully navigate the financial liability of loans.
  • Leaning on loans: If you’re going back to school to better your employment credentials in the hopes of earning more money in your career, consider the final balance. Will the potential increase in salary outweigh the loans you’ll eventually have to repay in order to earn your degree? The article points out that nontraditional students don’t qualify for many of the grant and scholarship programs that traditional students do, so they’re more likely to have to rely on federal and private loans. Student Success encourages students to look at an estimate of what their borrowing might end up at over their time in college to ensure that their return will be worth the investment (or loans). The good news is, at Columbia College, tuition for online undergraduate courses for 2017-18 is about half the cost of the national tuition and fees average for private nonprofit and for-profit institutions, based on a 30-credit-hour academic year.
  • Forgetting about the long term: A 22-year-old recent graduate has a 40-year career ahead of him or her before retirement age. That leaves plenty of time to pay off student debt. A 42-year-old recent graduate has to fit his or her financial obligations into a tighter window if he or she still wants to retire on time. U.S. News & World Report suggests budgeting a debt payment schedule based on your current income rather than any expected pay bump with a college degree. We hope that this encourages our students to look at paying off loans faster than required by the payment plan or borrow less. The more that they can do this, the faster they will get to a better financial place with their degree.

Even with financial aid considerations, going back to school is a decision that could pay off in the long run. According to 2015 U.S. Census data, the yearly median earnings for people 25 years and older were 21 percent higher with some college or an associate degree ($33,820) than with a high school diploma or equivalency ($28,043). The figure for bachelor’s degree holders ($50,595) was 80 percent higher than the high school earnings level, and the figure for graduate or professional degree holders ($66,857) was 138 percent higher. Education matters!

If you need any guidance utilizing the financial resources Columbia College has to offer or have questions about how to be a smart borrower, the Columbia College Department of Student Success and Money Stacks is here to help. You can contact the Department of Student Success and Money Stacks at (573) 875-7860 or studentsuccess@ccis.edu.

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What to consider when considering a career change

By Grossnickle Career Services Center

time for a change typewriter graphicLately, the staff at Columbia College’s Grossnickle Career Services Center has been getting variations on the same type of question quite frequently: “What should I know before making a career change?”

Deciding to leave your field for another can be a stressful process, definitely not one to be taken lightly. But, in the long run, it could also end up leading to a rewarding change of pace, either financially, emotionally or in other aspects of your life.

When considering whether to change careers, try to think about these things:

  • How do you feel at your current job? A February 2014 article from Fast Company magazine lists three telltale signs that it may be time to change careers. First, is your paycheck the only thing fueling your workday? Second, do you wake up every workday wishing you could be anywhere but where you are? Third, do you have bad performance reviews? If you’re getting no enjoyment out of your job, performing in a mediocre manner and only showing up every day to get paid, it may be time to move on.
  • Are you switching for the right reasons? So how can you tell whether you’ve hit a momentary rut at work or it’s time to plant roots somewhere else? An April 2013 article on KeppieCareers.com cautions against making rash decisions based on factors that may not even change with a career move. Evaluate why you’re unhappy with your job. Is it the work itself, or the office culture? If you’re frustrated with long hours or a lack of upward mobility, ask yourself if it’s worth starting at the bottom rung of the ladder somewhere else for the chance those aspects will be more favorable. If you’re feeling bored or unchallenged, think about how long it may be before you start feeling that way in a new career.
  • Is there anything you can do to improve your current situation? The answer to your work malaise may not be outside your workplace’s walls. It may lie within you. An April 2012 Forbes.com story on the biggest mistakes career changers make suggests that you start repairing relationships and building respect and skills at your current job before deciding whether to leave. If you do end up leaving, then you’re in a better position to succeed in your next career. If you stay, then you’ve taken steps to improve your workplace environment. Whatever you do, the article warns, make sure you put copious amounts of time and research into the decision. And if you do change careers, be sure to give yourself time to settle in before deciding you need to be on the move again!

If you’re in need of advice, you can also reach out to the Grossnickle Career Services Center at (573) 875-7425 or email careerservices@ccis.edu.

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Elgin CC 360 Fall Edition

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017 in Elgin | 0 comments

Elgin CC 360 Fall Edition

Elgin location awards Westling Scholarship

By Karen Beckstrom, director, Columbia College of Missouri-Elgin

scholarship presentation

Christina Aagesen (left) received the Westling Scholarship from Columbia College of Missouri-Elgin Director Karen Beckstrom.

Columbia College of Missouri-Elgin is proud to announce that Christina Aagesen has been awarded the 2017-18 Westling Scholarship. The $750 scholarship honors Frank S. Westling, a highly decorated infantry officer and former dean of the college’s Extended Studies division, now Adult Higher Education.

Aagesen is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree, with a political science major. She enjoys her Columbia College classes and appreciates the challenges of the coursework that will prepare her for future endeavors in her field.

“It is such an honor to receive this scholarship, and it will be extremely helpful as I continue my education,” Aagesen says. “Receiving scholarships like these make it easier for me to focus on completing my degree.”

Columbia College appreciates scholars like Aagesen who dedicate their valuable time and effort to becoming an excellent student! Congratulations to Christina!

For the 2017-18 academic year, Columbia College awarded Westling scholarships to 20 students from 11 Nationwide locations. The scholarship is non-renewable and awarded to new students each year.

To qualify for the Westling award, recipients must meet these requirements:

  • Be an Online, Evening or Nationwide location student pursuing a degree with Columbia College
  • Have attended Columbia College during the 2017-18 academic year (scholarship applies to the 2018-2019 academic year)
  • Have a minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Have at least 15 credit hours with Columbia College
  • Provide evidence of leadership and service to their community, school or country
  • Write a 400-500-word essay about their achievements and career goals

Those interested in giving to the Westling Scholarship may make a gift securely online.

Local officials visit Columbia College-Elgin Public Policy class

Adjunct instructor Kathleen McNamara’s public policy class enjoyed a visit from Hanover Park Mayor Rodney Craig and Carol Stream Clerk Sherry Craig on August 2.

On Wednesday, August 2, Columbia College students had the opportunity to learn from two local municipal officials. Hanover Park Mayor Rodney Craig and former Hanover Park Clerk/Collector and current Carol Stream Clerk Sherry Craig visited the MGMT/PADM 311: Public Administration and Policy class taught by adjunct faculty member Kathleen McNamara.

According to McNamara, the Craigs’ presentation provided her students with an opportunity to learn from working public officials who understand the realities of running local government. Both officials were able to provide examples of real government projects that illustrated course concepts and really made them interesting.

“The Craigs’ willingness to share their experience and to answer my students’ questions really made for a great night and, I believe, reminded all of us of the importance of civic engagement in our communities,” McNamara said.

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You are not alone

By Kim Major, senior academic advisor for Ready.Aim.Hire.

adult student learnersYou are not alone. That statement is as true for an adult student as it was for Fox Mulder in the TV show The X-Files.

Deciding to begin higher education as an adult or return to it after being away for a long period of time is a courageous choice! It’s not going to be as scary as you might think. Here is proof that you are not alone. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) projected a 13-percent increase in enrollment of nontraditional (adult) students between 2011 and 2021.

So if you are an adult who chooses to pursue higher education, how will you choose your first course? What do you need to know about studying? Where can you find help if you struggle?

Here are some tips for returning and new adult students that might help you along the way:

  • Meet with your advisor. She or he works for you! Think about your favorite subjects in high school or courses you had success with in college, if this is not your first time in college. Your academic advisor will then help you select your first class.
  • Begin with an introductory course, even if you’ve attended college before. Try a beginning course in your major, such as BIOL 108, CJAD 101, HUMS 105, MGMT 150, PSYC 101 or SOCI 111, OR take something in an area that interests you, such as HIST 121 or ARTS 105, OR even take a course to help you refresh or learn new skills, such as INCC 123 or ENGL 107.
  • Before you go to your first night of class or log into an online class, read the course syllabus. Hopefully, you’ve already looked at it, but take time to read it again. Flip through your textbook. Better yet, read the first chapter. You do have your textbook, don’t you?
  • Get to know fellow students and create a support network. Exchange contact information. Support from family and friends is one of the most important success factors for adult learners.
  • Use your resources, including our online Tutoring Services and electronic library. You can find the current Tutoring Services schedule here, and some Nationwide locations offer face-to-face math and English tutoring free of charge. The library has course guides for a ton of subjects, from art and biology to psychology and religious studies as well as many other areas tied to specific Columbia College courses.
  • Talk to your instructor, especially if you feel unsure or are struggling.
  • Consult the list of strategies for success, specifically for nontraditional adult learners. At Columbia College, the Writing Center and Tutoring Services webpages have links to study strategies and skills, including time management, note-taking styles, test-taking tips and other helpful topics.

Once you get through that first course, you will be able to build on your experience and become increasingly successful. You are ready to begin!

Back to top

 

We want to hear from you!

By Columbia College Public Relations

survey graphicThe CC 360 Nationwide digital newsletters are an informative way to keep our community up to date on all the happenings around Columbia College, and we want your help making them the best they can be!

We want to hear from you. We want to give you a chance to tell us which features you use the most when we send out our newsletters at the beginning of each semester, what sort of content you like to see, and what types of things you would like to see more of in future editions of the newsletter.

Simply click on this link and take our anonymous, nine-question survey about the CC 360 digital newsletters to make your voice heard. Your feedback is appreciated!

Back to top

 

Financial aid for nontraditional students

By Department of Student Success and Money Stacks

money stacks, financial awarenessCollege holds a different, unique set of challenges for adult learners, nontraditional students who are either picking up their college education again or entering an institution for the first time since high school.

The challenges start before enrolling in classes, continue during a college career that includes juggling family and professional responsibilities with schooling and extend long after a degree is earned, with financial-aid debt.

Yes, most students — traditional and nontraditional alike — incur debt. But nontraditional students have a special set of circumstances to consider when deciding whether to take on this debt, as well as how much they can take on.

A U.S. News & World Report article from January 2017 highlighted three potential financial aid traps for nontraditional students to avoid:

  • Not completing a degree: A 2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York study concluded that students who don’t complete their degrees are significantly more likely to default on their loans than ones who do. This leaves borrowers with no degree as well as financial liabilities. U.S. News & World Report urges nontraditional learners to find ways to navigate their courses without having to take out loans. Deliberate course planning will help to ensure academic success and may include limiting the number of courses taken to be able to pay out of pocket, utilizing tuition and student loan reimbursement programs through their employers and ensuring that opportunities to utilize Pell Grant funding are maximized. The Department of Student Success recommends working with advisors to ensure you are setting a good pace for yourself and, if you do end up needing to take time off school, to contact Student Success to talk about your options with loans to ensure you are able to successfully navigate the financial liability of loans.
  • Leaning on loans: If you’re going back to school to better your employment credentials in the hopes of earning more money in your career, consider the final balance. Will the potential increase in salary outweigh the loans you’ll eventually have to repay in order to earn your degree? The article points out that nontraditional students don’t qualify for many of the grant and scholarship programs that traditional students do, so they’re more likely to have to rely on federal and private loans. Student Success encourages students to look at an estimate of what their borrowing might end up at over their time in college to ensure that their return will be worth the investment (or loans). The good news is, at Columbia College, tuition for online undergraduate courses for 2017-18 is about half the cost of the national tuition and fees average for private nonprofit and for-profit institutions, based on a 30-credit-hour academic year.
  • Forgetting about the long term: A 22-year-old recent graduate has a 40-year career ahead of him or her before retirement age. That leaves plenty of time to pay off student debt. A 42-year-old recent graduate has to fit his or her financial obligations into a tighter window if he or she still wants to retire on time. U.S. News & World Report suggests budgeting a debt payment schedule based on your current income rather than any expected pay bump with a college degree. We hope that this encourages our students to look at paying off loans faster than required by the payment plan or borrow less. The more that they can do this, the faster they will get to a better financial place with their degree.

Even with financial aid considerations, going back to school is a decision that could pay off in the long run. According to 2015 U.S. Census data, the yearly median earnings for people 25 years and older were 21 percent higher with some college or an associate degree ($33,820) than with a high school diploma or equivalency ($28,043). The figure for bachelor’s degree holders ($50,595) was 80 percent higher than the high school earnings level, and the figure for graduate or professional degree holders ($66,857) was 138 percent higher. Education matters!

If you need any guidance utilizing the financial resources Columbia College has to offer or have questions about how to be a smart borrower, the Columbia College Department of Student Success and Money Stacks is here to help. You can contact the Department of Student Success and Money Stacks at (573) 875-7860 or studentsuccess@ccis.edu.

Back to top

 

What to consider when considering a career change

By Grossnickle Career Services Center

time for a change typewriter graphicLately, the staff at Columbia College’s Grossnickle Career Services Center has been getting variations on the same type of question quite frequently: “What should I know before making a career change?”

Deciding to leave your field for another can be a stressful process, definitely not one to be taken lightly. But, in the long run, it could also end up leading to a rewarding change of pace, either financially, emotionally or in other aspects of your life.

When considering whether to change careers, try to think about these things:

  • How do you feel at your current job? A February 2014 article from Fast Company magazine lists three telltale signs that it may be time to change careers. First, is your paycheck the only thing fueling your workday? Second, do you wake up every workday wishing you could be anywhere but where you are? Third, do you have bad performance reviews? If you’re getting no enjoyment out of your job, performing in a mediocre manner and only showing up every day to get paid, it may be time to move on.
  • Are you switching for the right reasons? So how can you tell whether you’ve hit a momentary rut at work or it’s time to plant roots somewhere else? An April 2013 article on KeppieCareers.com cautions against making rash decisions based on factors that may not even change with a career move. Evaluate why you’re unhappy with your job. Is it the work itself, or the office culture? If you’re frustrated with long hours or a lack of upward mobility, ask yourself if it’s worth starting at the bottom rung of the ladder somewhere else for the chance those aspects will be more favorable. If you’re feeling bored or unchallenged, think about how long it may be before you start feeling that way in a new career.
  • Is there anything you can do to improve your current situation? The answer to your work malaise may not be outside your workplace’s walls. It may lie within you. An April 2012 Forbes.com story on the biggest mistakes career changers make suggests that you start repairing relationships and building respect and skills at your current job before deciding whether to leave. If you do end up leaving, then you’re in a better position to succeed in your next career. If you stay, then you’ve taken steps to improve your workplace environment. Whatever you do, the article warns, make sure you put copious amounts of time and research into the decision. And if you do change careers, be sure to give yourself time to settle in before deciding you need to be on the move again!

If you’re in need of advice, you can also reach out to the Grossnickle Career Services Center at (573) 875-7425 or email careerservices@ccis.edu.

Back to top